Issue of December 31, 2017
     
NEWS
Benguet
Ifugao
Kalinga
Mt. Province
 
OPINION
 

2017
Panagbenga Flower Festival
 
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WEEK'S MAIL
We welcome your letters and opinions. Kindly limit your letters to a page, preferably typewritten and doublespaced. However, for your letters to be considered for publication, it is essential that all letters must be SIGNED above your PRINTED NAME (you may request your name to be withheld or substituted with your pen name) and must include your ADDRESS and PHONE NUMBER. Letters and emails deficient in any of the above requisites will not be entertained. Please be guided accordingly. Thank you.
 
Good enough
SATURNINA PINTANG GARCIA, Baguio City

One of the problems faced in completing day-to-day tasks is complacency. Some people have the “good enough” mentality. They are comfy-as is. They don’t feel the need to spend the extra energy to make their work more dynamic or effective. They become accustomed to doing things in a certain way or tasks flowing a certain way and grow oblivious to the repercussions that may arise from it.

Yet “good is the enemy of great,” meaning that when we’re satisfied with what’s good enough, we’ll fail to pursue what’s great. Feeling dread in creating extra work for one’s self is sometimes a common form of complacency. Like others, I was guilty of this, too. There were times I felt I’m busy enough trying to plan lessons, grade work, conference with students, attend meetings, and do home visits. So I told myself why do I have to spend extra time developing new lessons and materials when I already have the old ones? Why should I do this if my colleagues aren’t? Is it really necessary to create extra work for myself, and how much would this extra work pay off in terms of improved student success?

You know complacency may already have a strong hold on you if your enthusiasm dwindles, when you become disengaged, stop taking initiatives, don’t take risk, or lose your passion. When complacency is prevalent in the workplace, it becomes productivity killer. Without intervention, resistance to change increases over time. Employees’ responses towards extra work would become reactive, instead of proactive.

Complacency is never the hallmark of great people. This state of mind can affect many things including productivity, quality, and safety. Some of the consequences of complacency include safety accidents, few new ideas or innovations being proposed, or loss of current customers and future customers (as they spread the word to others about the bad service they received). This can have a tremendous detrimental effect on the future of the business or image of an institution. Most of all, if you are a career person, complacency wouldn’t get you anywhere.

If you are one who has grown complacent in the workplace, don’t fret. All is not lost. You can renew your passion and re-engage yourself in many ways. Start by putting all conditions in place and soon you probably will notice learning takes off, knowledge escalates, and performance soars. To live a life that is better than good means that you not only continually grow and improve yourself and your life, but as a result, you create a ripple effect of transformative change with every single life you touch.  And to accomplish this, quit the “good enough” habit and must live and die in the spirit of ever-increasing quality, passion, persistence, accountability, and trust.

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MORE ON WEEK'S MAIL
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:: Wishes for the New Year
During the New Year, it is to make wishes for desirable change in behavior and performance to have a better life as we face complexities in society.
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:: In Christian perspective, no such thing as chance
Tossing a coin, drawing straws, or taking a number out of a box have been ways of solving disputes. I read of an election in the U.S.A. where two leading candidates each received 150 votes.
 

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